Keiro-kai (Keiro-shikiten)—Ceremony to express gratitude to the aged for their contribution to HBS

Keiro-kai (Keiro-shikiten)—Ceremony to express gratitude to the aged for their contribution to HBS

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In Japan, the third Monday in September is called “Respect for the Aged Day.” Various events are taken place to celebrate aged persons’ longevity across Japan. In Honmon Butsuryu Shu, we express gratitude and show appreciation for their longtime contribution to the propagation of HBS holding a Buddhist service and recreation.

Keiro literally means “respecting the aged,” and Kai or Shikiten means a “ceremony.” in Japanese. We now have the faith in the Odaimoku thanks to aged HBS members who have maintained temples and spread the teaching vigorously to hand down the Odaimoku to posterity. To thank them, we hold a Keiro-kai on a grand scale at every HBS temple.

 

Follow Ryosetsu Ikemoto:

Buddhist Priest of Honmon Butsuryū Shū (HBS), belongs to Kosenji temple in Nishinomiya, Hyogo Pref., Japan. Secretary to the 25th HBS head priest.

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